/^/.-v^'W%;^"'

ib^ Y > J ?;.. >

> >

T^-"- f .

3iavHan_

ISTITUTION^ N0liniliSNi;;jNVIN0SHimS^S3 I a VM a n^LI B RAR I ES^SMITHSONIAN^INSTITUI

3IHVaan~LIBRARI Es'^SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION'^NOIinillSNI NVINOSHilWS S3 I HVil 2 C/) Z t^ 5 ^ _^a8i.

ISTITUTION '^N0liniliSNI^NVIN0SHims'^S3 I d Vb 3 Ilf LI B RAR I Es'^SMITHSONIAN^INSTITU'

5 I Mvy a n ""lI B RAR I ES^SMITHS0NIAN"^INSTITUTI0N NOIiniIlSNl"'NVINOSHilWS S3 I avj jiawaai ' - ^ p" ^ Z n z

MciTiTiiTinN'^ NOIinillSNl''NVINOSHiIWS S3 I H\fh 3 ll^LI B RAR I ES SMITHS0NIAN"|NSTITL

o z

:3 I y vy a n^ LI B RAR I ES^^SMITHSONIAN^ institution NOIinillSNI NVIN0SHiIWS*^S3 I d V z ~

NSTITUTI0N^N0liniliSNl''NVIN0SHimS^S3liiVMan"'LIBRARIES_SMITHS0NIAN INSTITL z r- ,, z »- z ^ ^.-—

53iavyan""LIBRARIES^SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION'^NOIinillSNI NVINOSHilWS S3IMV z , ^ ^^ ^ z ^ ^5 ^^ . ^

INSTITUTION *^N0liniliSNI^NVIN0SHillNS*^S3 I y'va a n\lB RAR I Es'^SMITHSONIANJNSTITL

« ^.

i2^oc.

^ Z^'^^'

)liniliSNl''NVIN0SHiIWS^S3iavyan''LIBRARIES^SMITHS0NIAN"|lNSTITUTI0N_N0lini!i

B RAR I ES^SMITHSONIAN^INSTITUTION^NOIiniliSNI^NVINOSHill/MS S3 I MVM 9 H LI B RAR _ t/) z «/) z ^ ^^ ^

)liniliSNI^NVIN0SHilWS^S3 I liVa 8 llf LI B RAR I ES^^SMITHSONIAN ^INSTITUTION NOIinill

2 -J Z _l Z -1

BRARIES SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION NOIiniliSNI NVINOSHilWS S3iyVMan LIB RAR

en

>

DIiniliSNrNVINOSHimS SSiaVaan^LIBRARIES^^SMITHSONIAN'lNSTITUTION NOIlflil ~ V* "Z. ^f, (^ z .V w

CO 2 to *. Z to

__ _ z ^ ^ to * z

I B RAR I ES*"SMITHSONIAN_INSTITUTION"NOIiniIlSNI_NVINOSHlIWS S3 I aVM 8 11 >' B RAR

=1 <

3IiniliSNrNVINOSHimS^S3 I a Vy a n"'LI B RAR l es^smithsonian~'institution NOIinil. r- . Z ^ r- z «" ^ Z ^

to ± to ± to =

BRARIES SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION NOIifliliSNI NVINOSHilWS S3iaVdan LIB RAR ^ ^^ z, to z ^^5-

o to

X

OliniliSNI NVIN0SHims'^S3iavyan^LIBRARIES*^SMITHS0NIAN INSTITUTION NOIiniL ~ vi z: to = f>

°A -I

z ^ -J z _ _

IRRARIF.c; <?MITH«inNIAW INCiTITI ITIOM MniinillQMI WWIMnQWIIIAIC C:il^JWMai-l LIBRAR

PROCEEDINGS

of the

ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY

of WASHINGTON

Volume 86

OmCERS FOR THE YEAR 1984 President President-elect Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary Treasurer Editor Custodian Program Chairman Membership Chairman Delegate to the Washington Academy of Sciences

Published by the Society

WASHINGTON, D.C. 1984

Neal O. Morgan

Donald M. Anderson

Thomas E. Wallenmaier

Richard G. Robbins

Thomas J. Henry

Raymond J. Gagne

Victor L. Blackburn

Jeffrey R. Aldrich

Geoffrey B. White

Manya B. Stoetzel

Table of Contents, Volume 86 in celebration of the centennial

SABROSKY, C. W.-In days of yore 733

SPILMAN, T. J. Vignettes of 100 years of the Entomological Society of Washington 1

STOETZEL, M. B.-ESW Past-Presidents for the years 1884 through 1983, Photographs and

Support Officers 33

STOETZEL, M. B.— The Centennial of the Entomological Society of Washington, March 12,

1984 971

MEMBERSHIP LIST 36

ARTICLES ALM, S. R. andF. E. KURCZEWSKI- Ethology of Anoplius tenebrosus (Cresson) (Hymenop-

tera: Pompiidae) 110

APPEL, A. G.-See SILVERMAN, J.

BARNES, J. K. Biology and immature stages of Dryomyza anilis Fallen (Diptera: Dryomyzi-

dae) 43

BARROWS, E. M. Perch sites and food of adult Chinese mantids (Dictyoptera: Mantidae) . . 898

9m PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

BAUMANN, R. W. andG. Z. JACOBI— Two new species of stoneflies (Plecoptera) from New

Mexico 147

BEAL, R. S., JR. A new sand-dune-inhabiting Novelsis (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) from Cal- ifornia and Nevada 630

BLANCHARD, A. and E. C. KNUDSON— A new species of Hypomecis Hiibner (Lepidoptera:

Geometridae) from Texas and Florida 29 1

BLANCHARD, A. and E. C. KNUDSON— A new Stibadium from Texas and a Redescription

of Striodes edentatus (Grote) (Noctuidae: Lepidoptera) 346

BLANCHARD, A. and E. C. KNUDSON— Three new tortricids (Lepidoptera) from Texas . . . 446 BLANCHARD, A. and E. C. KNUDSON— A new species of Tripudia Grote (Lepidoptera:

Noctuidae) from western Texas 639

BLANCHARD, A. -See FERGUSON, D.C.

BLANCHARD, A. -See TODD, E. L.

BOHLS, R. A. -See MCDANIEL, B.

BRENNER, R. J.— An in vivo fluorescent marker for spermatozoa of the screwworm (Diptera:

CalHphoridae): A first report 714

BROWN, R. L. Review of Corticivora (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) with analysis of its tribal

relationships and descriptions of new species 278

BULLINGTON, S. W.-See LAVIGNE, R. J.

BURGER, J. F.— Notes on Tabanidae (Diptera) of the Oriental region II. Distribution records

of some Tabanidae from southeastern Pakistan and a list of species from Pakistan and adjacent

areas 643

CALABRESE, D. M. and P. TALLERICO— Cytogenetic study in males of Nearctic genera of

Gerridae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) 354

CLARK, W. E. Species of Sibinia Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) associated with Mimosa

pigra L 358

COWAN, D. P. and G. P. WALDBAUER— Seasonal occurrence and mating at flowers by

Ancistrocerus antilope (Hymenoptera: Eumenidae) 930

CWIKLA, P. S.-See DELONG, D. M.

DARLING, D. C. and N. F. JOHNSON Synopsis of Nearctic Azotinae (Hymenoptera:

Aphelinidae) 555

DAVIDSON, J. A.-SEE MILLER, D. R.

DELONG, D. M. and P. S. CWIKLA— A new genus and species of deltocephaline leafhopper

from Panama (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) 432

DOYEN, J. T. Reconstitution of the Diaperini of North America, with new species ofAdelina

and Sitophagus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) 777

EMERSON, K. C.-See SCHARF, W. C.

FARMER, B. R. and W. H. ROBINSON— Harborage limitation as a component of a German

cockroach pest management program (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) 269

FENNAH, R. G.— A new Paruzelia from Sri Lanka (Homoptera: Fulgoroidea: Tropiduchidae) 144 FERGUSON, D. C— Two new generic names for groups of Holarctic and Palearctic Arctiini

(Lepidoptera, Arctiidae) 452

FERGUSON, D. C, A. BLANCHARD, andE. C. KNUDSON-A new species of Neodavisia

Barnes and McDunnough (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) from southern Texas 769

FOOTE, B. A. Biology of Trimerina madizans, a predator of spider eggs (Diptera: Ephyd-

ridae) 486

FORSTER, L.-See WIRTH, W. W. FROESCHNER, R. C.-See ROLSTON, L. H. FROMMER, S. I. -See PINTO, J. D. GAD, A. M.-See HARBACH, R. E.

GAGNE, R. J. and K. VALLEY— Two new species of Cecidomyiidae (Diptera) from honey- locust, Gleditsia triacanthos L. (Fabaceae), in eastern United States 543

VOLUME 86, NUMBER 4 -^4

GERDES, C. F.—Eurythrips and Terthrothrips (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) from southern

Brazil, with one new species, new collection sites, and key 400

GILES, F. E. andW. W. WIRTH— Two new species of Oriental biting midges (Diptera: Cerato-

pogonidae) 210

GILL, R. J. -See MILLER, D. R.

GRIMES, L. R. and H. H. NEUNZIG— The larvae and pupae of three phycitine species

(Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) that occur in Florida 411

GROGAN, W. L., JR.-See SPINELLI, G. R.

HANSENS, E. J. -See SOFIELD, R. K.

HARBACH, R. E. A new species of Toxomerus (Diptera, Syrphidae) from Brazil, with notes

on three related species 840

HARBACH, R. E., B. A. HARRISON, and A. M. GAD-Cw/ex {Culex) molestus ForskSl

(Diptera: Culicidae): Neotype designation, description, variation, and taxonomic status ... 521 HARMAN, A. L.-See HARMAN, D. M. HARM AN, D. M. and A. L. HARMAN— Comparison of stridulatory structures in North

American Pissodes spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) 228

HARRIS, S. C Redescription oi Agapetus avitus Edwards (Trichoptera: Glossosomatidae)

with notes on morphological variation and distribution 745

HARRIS, S. C. and R. W. KELLEY-New species of Hydroptilidae (Trichoptera) from

Alabama 572

HARRISON, B. A. -See HARBACH, R. E.

HAWKINS, B. A.-See SPENCER, K. A.

HENRY, T. J. Revision of the spider-commensal plant bug genus Ranzovius Distant (Het-

eroptera: Miridae) 53

HENRY, T. J.— New species of Isometopinae (Hemiptera: Miridae) from Mexico, with new

records for previously described North American species 337

HENRY, T. J.— New United States records for two Heteroptera: Pellaea stictica (Pentatomidae)

and Rhinacloa pallidipes (Miridae) 519

HENRY, T. J. -See SNODGRASS, G. L.

HOBERLANDT, L.-See ROLSTON, L. H.

HOEBEKE, E. R. and A. G. WHEELER, }K.—Aethus nigritus (F.), a Palearctic burrower bug

established in eastern North America (Hemiptera-Heteroptera: Cydnidae) 738

HOEBEKE, E. R.-See WHEELER, Q. D.

HURYN, A. D.— New Notiphila (Diptera: Ephydridae) from the Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia 942 IVIE, M. A. and}. B. STRIBLING— Taxonomic and nomenclatorial notes on Caribbean Tro- picus Pacheco (Coleoptera: Heteroceridae) 946

JACOBI, G. Z.-See BAUMANN, R. W.

JOHNSON, N. F.-See DARLING, D. C.

JOHNSON, N. T. Revision of the Nearctic species of the Trissolcus flavipes group (Hyme-

noptera: Scelionidae) 797

KELLEY, R. W.-See HARRIS, S. C.

KIM, K. C.-See NORRBOM, A. L.

KINGSOLVER, J. M.— The Noona Dan Expedition: Descriptions of two new species of Bru-

chidae (Coleoptera) from the Philippines 369

KIRCHNER, R. F. and B. C. KONDRATIEFF-A new Diploperia from West Virginia (Ple-

coptera: Perlodidae) 648

KIRCHNER, R. F.-See KONDRATIEFF, B. C.

KNUDSON, E. C.-See BLANCH ARD, A. (four articles)

KNUDSON, E. C.-See FERGUSON, D. C.

KONDRATIEFF, B. C. and R. F. KIRCHNER-A new species of Nemouridae (Plecoptera)

from the Great Dismal Swamp, Virginia, USA 578

KONDRATIEFF, B. C.-See KIRCHNER, R. F.

9ffl PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

KURCZEWSKI, E. J. -See KURCZEWSKI, F. E.

KURCZEWSKI, F. E. and E. J. KURCZEWSKI -Mating and nesting behavior of Tachytes intermedius (Viereck) (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) 176

KURCZEWSKI, F. E.-See ALM, S. R.

LAMBDIN, P. L. a«^ G. Q. LU External morphology of eggs of the spined soldier bug, Podisus maculiventris (Say) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) 374

LAVIGNE, R. J. Ethology of Neocerdistus acutangulatus (Diptera: Asilidae) in South Aus- tralia 422

LAVIGNE, R. J. andS. W. BULLINGTON- Ethology of Laphria femaldi (Back) (Diptera: Asilidae) in southeast Wyoming 326

LAVIGNE, R. J. -See LAWSON, F. A.

LAVIGNE, R. J. -See POGUE, M. G.

LAWSON, F. A. and R. J. LAVIGNE— Oviposition and eggs of an Australian robber fly, Neoaratus abludo Daniels (Diptera: Asilidae) 773

LOAN, C. C.-See WHEELER, A. G., JR.

LOUTON, J. A. -See TENNESSEN, K. J.

LU, G. Q.-See LAMBDIN, P. L.

McCABE, T. L.— A new Cautethia from the Bahamas (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) 614

McCaffrey, j. p.-see wheeler, a. g., jr.

McDANIEL, B. and R. A. BOHLS— The distribution and host range of Entomophaga grylli (Fresenius), a fungal parasite of grasshoppers in South Dakota 864

MAIER, C. T. Habitats, distributional records, seasonal activity, abundance, and sex ratios of Boreidae and Meropeidae (Mecoptera) collected in New England 608

MALAN, S. C.-See STAINES, C. L., JR.

MARI MUTT, J. A. Five new species of Orchesellini from central Mexico (Collembola: Entomobryidae: Orchesellinae) 808

MARSH, P. M.— A new species of Braconidae (Hymenoptera) from Mexico introduced into Texas to control a sugar cane borer, Eoreuma loftini (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) 861

MARSHALL, S. K.—Lepiocera (Pteremis) Rondani in North America (Diptera, Sphaeroceridae) 396

MARTINEZ, A. and R. B. SELANDER— A new species of Pyrota from Argentina (Coleop- tera: Meloidae) 653

MATHIS, W. N.— Notes on the shore fly genus Diedrops (Diptera: Ephydridae) 349

MILLER, D. R., J. A. DAVIDSON, andyi. B. STOETZEL-A taxonomic study of the armored scale Pseudischnaspis Hempel (Homoptera: Coccoidea: Diaspididae) 94

MILLER, D. R., R. J. GILL, and D. J. WILLIAMS— Taxonomic analysis of Pseudococcus affinis (Maskell), a senior synonym of Pseudococcus obscurus Essig, and a comparison with Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhom) (Homoptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae) 703

MORON, M. A. and B. C. RATCLIFFE— Description of the larva and pupa of Argyripa lansbergei (Salle) with new distributional records for the genus and a key to New World Gymnetini larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) 760

NAKAHARA, S.— A new genus and two new species of armored scales from Mexico (Ho- moptera: Diaspididae) 935

NEUNZIG, H. H.-See GRIMES, L. R.

NORRBOM, A. L. and K. C. KIM— The taxonomic status of Lotophila Lioy, with a review of L. atra (Meigen) (Diptera: Sphaeroceridae) 305

ORTH, R. E.— A new species of Pherbellia from Montana (Diptera: Sciomyzidae) 599

ORTH, R. E.— A new species of Dictya from Mexico (Diptera: Sciomyzidae) 893

PAKALUK, J. Natural history and evolution of Lycoperdina ferruginea (Coleoptera: Endo- mychidae) with descriptions of immature stages 312

PALCHICK, S. M.-See WIRTH, W. W.

PINTO, J. D.— A taxonomic review of Cysteodemus LeConte, Phodaga LeConte and Pleuro- pasta Wellman (Coleoptera: Meloidae: Eupomphina) with a new generic synonymy 127

VOLUME 86, NUMBER 4

PINTO, J. D.— New generic synonymies in the Epicautina (Coleoptera: Meloidae: Meloinae) 378 PINTO, J. D. and S. I. FROMMER Laboratory and field observations on the life history of

Epinotia kasloana McDunnough (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae: Olethreutinae), a moth feeding

on jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schneider) 199

POGUE, M. G. andR. J. LAVIGNE— The distribution of the western budworm, Choristoneura

occidentalis Freeman (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Wyoming 439

POLHEMUS, D. A. andi. T. VOlAiEM\JS— Ephedrodoma, a new genus of orthotyline Miridae

(Hemiptera) from western United States 550

POLHEMUS, J. T.-See POLHEMUS, D. A.

POOLE, R. W.-See TODD, E. L.

PRATT, G. K.-See PRATT, H. D.

PRATT, H. D. andG. K. PRATT-The winter crane flies of the eastern United States (Diptera:

Trichoceridae) 249

RATCLIFFE, B. C.-See MORON, M. A.

ROBINSON, W. H.-See FARMER, B. R.

ROLSTON, L. H.— A review of the genus Thoreyella spinola (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) . . . 826

ROLSTON, L. H., L. HOBERLANDT, and R. C. ¥KOES,C\iHER-Scotinophara sicula A.

Costa, a Mediterranean species in the Virgin Islands (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae: Podopinae) 266

ROSS, E. S.— A synopsis of the Embiidina of the United States 82

SCARBROUGH, A. G. Four species of Ommatius Wiedemann (Diptera: Asilidae) from Puer- to Rico and the Virgin Islands 619

SCHARF, W. C. and K. C. EMERSON— A revision of Amyrsidea, subgenus Cracimenopon

(Mallophaga: Menoponidae) 877

SCHAUFF, M. E.— Taxonomic notes on Anaphes diana (Girault), an imported mymarid CHy-

menoptera: Mymaridae) egg parasite of Sitona weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) 214

SCOTT, W. P. -See SNODGRASS, G. L.

SELANDER, R. B. On the bionomics, anatomy, and systematics of Wagneronota (Coleoptera:

Meloidae) 469

SELANDER, R. B. and A. MARTINEZ— A synopsis of the genus Tetraonyx in Argentina

(Coleoptera: Meloidae) 913

SELANDER, R. B.-See MARTINEZ, A.

SHAFFER, J. C— Neotropical pyralid moths transferred from Anerastiinae (Auctorum) to

Phycitinae 383

SHAW, S. R.—Stenothremma, a new Euphorine genus from AustraUa (Hymenoptera: Bra-

conidae) 869

SHEA, T. L., JR. -See STAINES, C. L., JR.

SHELLY, T. E.— Prey selection by the Neotropical robber fly, Attractia marginata (Diptera:

Asilidae) 120

SHELLY, T. E. Prey selection by the Neotropical spider Micrathena schreibersi with notes

on web-site tenacity 493

SILVERMAN, J. and A. G. APPEL— The pupal cocoon of the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis

(Bouche) (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae): A barrier to ant predation 660

SNODGRASS, G. L., T. J. HENRY, and W. P. SCOTT-An annotated list of the Miridae

(Heteroptera) found in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta and associated areas in Arkansas and

Louisiana 845

SOFIELD, R. K. and E. J. HANSENS— Rearing of Tabanus nigrovittatus (Diptera: Tabanidae) 195 SPENCER, K. A. and B. A. HAWKINS— An interesting new gall-forming Ophiomyia species

(Diptera: Agromyzidae) on Atriplex (Chenopodiaceae) in southern California 664

SPINELLI, G. R. and W. L. GROG AN, JR. -Three new species of Macrurohelea from Ar- gentina with a key to the Neotropical species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) 967

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

SPINELLI, G. R. and W. W. WIRTH— The Neotropical predaceous midges of the genus Alluaudomyia (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) 673

STAINES, C. L., JR.— Cereal leaf beetle, Oulema melanopus (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae): Density and parasitoid synchronization study in Washington County, Maryland 1977- 1979 435

STAINES, C. L., JR., S. C. MALAN, G. L. WILLIAMS, and T. L. SHEA, JR. -Species composition in a guild of overwintering Rhyacionia spp. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae, Ole- threutinae) populations in Maryland 821

STEFFAN, W. A.— A new species of Plastosciara (Diptera: Sciaridae) 287

STEINLY, B. A.— Shore fly (Diptera: Ephydridae) community structure in a xeric grass habitat 749

STEYSKAL, G. C A synoptic revision of the genus Aciurina Curran, 1932 (Diptera, Teph- ritidae) 582

STRIBLING, J. B.-See I VIE, M. A.

STOETZEL, M. B.-See MILLER, D. R.

SYNAVE, H.-See VAN STALLE, J.

TALLERICO, P. -See CALABRESE, D. M.

TENNESSEN, K. J.— The nymphs of Calopteryx amata and C angustipennis (Odonata: Calopterygidae) 602

TENNESSEN, K. J. andi. A. LOUTON— The true nymph of Gomphus (Gomphurus) crassus Hagen (Odonata: Gomphidae), with notes on adults 223

THOMAS, D. B., JR. Texaponium, a new genus for Cryptadius triplehorni Berry (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) 658

TODD, E. L., A. BLANCHARD, and R. W. POOLE- A revision of the genus Aleptina (Lep- idoptera: Noctuidae) 951

TOGASHI, I.— The genus Zaphymatocera Sato (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) in Japan, with description of a new species 443

TOGASHI, I.— A new genus and two new species of Blennocampinae (Hymenoptera: Ten- thredinidae) from Japan and Taiwan 635

VALLEY, K.-See GAGNE, R. J.

VAN STALLE, J. and H. SYNAVE— Description of four new west African Cixiidae (Homop- tera, Fulgoroidea) 217

VOEGTLIN, D.— A new species of Hyalomyzus (Homoptera: Aphididae) from Hypericum prolificum in Illinois 563

WALDBAUER, G. P.— Mating behavior at blossoms and the flower associations of mimetic Temnostoma spp. (Diptera: Syrphidae) in northern Michigan 295

WALDBAUER, G. P. -See COWAN, D. P.

WHARTON, R. A.— The status of certain Braconidae (Hymenoptera) cultured for biological control programs, and description of a new species of Macrocentrus 902

WHEELER, A. G., JR.— Seasonal history, habits, and immature stages of Belonochilus nu- menius (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae) 790

WHEELER, A. G., ]K. Clastoptera arborina: seasonal history and habits on ornamental ju- niper in Pennsylvania (Homoptera: Cercopidae) 835

WHEELER, A. G., JR. and C. C. \.OM<i Peristenus henryi (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Eu- phorinae), a new species parasitic on the honeylocust plant bug, Diaphnocoris chlorionis (Hemiptera: Miridae) 668

WHEELER, A. G., JR. and J. P. McCf<¥VREY Ranzovius contubernalis: seasonal history, habits, and description of fifth instar, with speculation on the origin of spider commensalism in the genus Ranzovius (Hemiptera: Miridae) 68

WHEELER, A. G., JR.-See HOEBEKE, E. R.

WHEELER, Q. D. and E. R. HOEBEKE-A review of mycophagy in the Eucinetoidea (Co- leoptera), with notes on an association of the eucinetid beetle, Eucinetus oviformis, with a Coniophoraceae fungus (Basidiomycetes: Aphyllorphorales) 274

VOLUME 86, NUMBER 4 9*5

WILLIAMS, D. J. -See MILLER, D. R.

WILLIAMS, G. L.-See STAINES, C. L., JR.

WIRTH, W. W., S. M. PALCHICK, and L. FORSTER-The North American predaceous

midges of the Bezzia annulipes Group (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) 155

WIRTH, W. W.-See GILES, F. E.

WIRTH, W. W.-See SPINELLI, G. R.

YOUNG, A. M. Ecological notes on cacao-associated midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in

the "Catongo" cacao plantation at Turrialba, Costa Rica 185

YOUNG, A. M. Mechanism of pollination by Phoridae (Diptera) in some Herrania species

(Sterculiaceae) in Costa Rica 503

NOTES

ADIS, J. -See SMITH, D. R.

BURGER, J. F. Lectotype designation for ra^aAJM^v/canwi Walker and comments on Tabanus

simulans Walker (Diptera: Tabanidae) 24 1

DEITZ, L. L. and D. L. STEPH AN— Records of Diradius vandykei (Ross) in North Carolina

and Virginia (Embiidina: Teratembiidae) 239

HENDRICKS, P. Notes on a hilltop aggregation of Lytta magister Horn (Coleoptera: Mel-

oidae) 46 1

HOPPER, H. P. On the question of the selector of the lectotypes of the species of Ichneu-

monidae described by Ezra Townsend Cresson 000

KURCZEWSKI, F. E.-See SPOFFORD, M. G.

McCAFFERTY, W. P.— A new synonym in Hexagenia (Ephemeroptera: Ephemeridae) .... 000

McCLURE, M. S. Pineus boerneri Annand (Homoptera: Adelgidae): A new or another record

from the People's Republic of China? 460

MENKE, A. S.— Edit ha magnifica (Perty) in Venezuela (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae: Nysson-

inae) 000

NICKLE, D. A.—Metrioptera roeseli (Hagenbach), a European katydid found for the first time

in Pennsylvania (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Decticinae) 000

SABROSKY, C. W.— An overlooked generic name in Chloropidae (Diptera) 713

SMITH, D. R. and}. ADIS— Notes on the systematics and natural history of Dielocerusfasciatus

(Enderlein) and key to species of the genus (Hymenoptera: Argidae) 720

SPOFFORD, M. G. and F. E. KURCZEWSKI-A new host for Perilampus hyalinus Say

(Hymenoptera: Perilampidae) 663

STAINES, C. L., JR. Distribution of Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) (Coleoptera: Scolyti-

dae) in Maryland 702

STEPH AN, D. L.-See DEITZ, L. L.

STEYSKAL, G. C Lectotype designation for Rhamphomyia abdita Coquillett (Diptera:

Empididae) 668

WALDBAUER, G. P. A wamingly colored fly, Stratiomys badius (Walker) (Diptera: Stratio-

myidae), uses its scutelar spines in defense 722

WENZEL, R. L.— Two name changes for Neotropical Streblidae (Diptera) 647

BOOK REVIEWS

BARROWS, E. M.-A Guide to Observing Insect Lives (D. L. Stokes) 000

KNUTSON, L. The Marsh Flies of California (Diptera: Sciomyzidae) (T. W. Fisher and R.

E. Orth) 463

NICKLE, D. A.- The Australian Crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) (D. Otte and R. D. Alex- ander) 245

PETERSON, B. V.— Notes on Neotropical Tabanidae (Diptera) XIX. The Tabanus lineola Com- plex (G. B. Fairchild) 724

ROBBINS, R. ¥^. New Zealand Butterflies, Identification and Natural History (G. W. Gibbs) 244

Sfo PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

SCHAEFER, C. V^. The Ultrastructure and Functioning of Insect Cells (H. Akai et al.) and

Insect Ultrastructure. Vol. 1 (R. C. King and H. Akai) 725

STEYSKAL, G. C Check List of the Lepidoptera of America. North of Mexico (R. W. Hodges

et al.) 628

MISCELLANEOUS

ANNOUNCEMENT 868

INFORMATION FOR PREPARATION OF MANUSCRIPTS 730

MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT 629

NOTICE OF A NEW PUBLICATION 247

SOCIETY MEETINGS 465

SUMMARY REPORTS OF SOCIETY OFFICERS FOR 1983 464

VOL 86 i ' JANUARY 1984 NO. 1

^"^ PROCEEDINGS

of the

ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY

^r^mry^^^ of WASHINGTON

fi^^^\ CENTENNIAL

S plTI I VOLUME

X\' i ^ '/7 PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

CONTENTS

IN CELEBRATION OF THE CENTENNIAL

SPILMAN, T. J.— Vignettes of 100 years of the Entomological Society of Washington 1

STOETZEL, M. B.-ESW Past-Presidents for the years 1884 through 1983, Photographs and

Support Officers 11

MEMBERSHIP LIST 36

ARTICLES

ALM, S. R. andY. E. KURCZEWSKI- Ethology of Anoplius tenebrosus (Cresson) (Hymenop-

tera: Pompilidae) 110

BARNES, J. K.— Biology and immature stages of Dryomyza anilis Fallen (Diptera: Dryomy-

zidae) 43

BAUMANN, R. W. and G. Z. JACOBI— Two new species of stoneflies (Plecoptera) from New

Mexico 147

FENNAH, R. G.— A new Paruzelia from Sri Lanka (Homoptera: Fulgoroidea: Tropiduchi-

dae) 144

GILES, F. E. and W. W. WIRTH— Two new species of Oriental biting midges (Diptera: Cera-

topogonidae) 210

HARMAN, D. M. and K. L. HARM AN— Comparison of stridulatory structures in North Amer- ican Pissodes spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) 228

HENRY, T. J.— Revision of the spider-commensal plant bug genus Ranzovius Distant (Heter-

optera: Miridae) 53

KURCZEWSKI, F. E. and E. J. KURCZEWSKI -Mating and nesting behavior of Tachytes

intermedius (Viereck) (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) 176

MILLER, D. R., J. A. DAVIDSON, and M. B. STOETZEL- A taxonomic study of the armored

scale Pseudischnaspis Hempel (Homoptera: Coccoidea: Diaspididae) 94

{Continued on back cover)

THE

ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY

OF WASHINGTON

Organized March 12, 1884

OFFICERS FOR 1984

Neal O. Morgan, President Jeffrey R. Aldrich, Program Chairman

Donald M. Anderson, President-Elect Geoffrey B. White, Membership Chairman

Thomas E. Wallenmaier, Recording Secretary Victor L. Blackburn, Custodian

Richard G. Robbins, Corresponding Secretary Manya B. Stoetzel, Delegate, Wash. Acad. Sci.

Thomas J. Henry, Treasurer Helen Sollers-Riedel, Hospitality Chairman

Raymond J. Gagne, Editor

Publications Committee David R. Smith Theodore J. Spilman George C. Steyskal

Honorary President C. F. W. Muesebeck

Honorary Members Frederick W. Poos Ashley B. Gurney Theodore L. Bissell

All correspondence concerning Society business should be mailed to the appropriate officer at the following address: Entomological Society of Washington, c/o Department of Entomology, NHB 168, Smithsonian Insti- tution, Washington, D.C. 20560.

MEETINGS. Regular meetings of the Society are held in the Natural History Building, Smithsonian Institution, on the first Thursday of each month from October to June, inclusive, at 8 P.M. Minutes of meetings are published regularly in the Proceedings.

MEMBERSHIP.— Members shall be persons who have demonstrated interest in the science of entomology. Annual dues for members are $15.00 (U.S. currency) of which $13.00 is for a subscription to the Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington for one year.

PROCEEDINGS.— Published quarterly beginning with January by the Society at Washington, D.C. Members in good standing receive the Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. Nonmember subscriptions are $25.00 per year, domestic, and $27.00 per year, foreign (U.S. currency), payable in advance. All remittances should be made payable to The Entomological Society of Washington. The Society does not exchange its publications for those of other societies.

Please see p. 183 of the January 1983 issue for information regarding preparation of manuscripts.

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP

Title of Publication: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington.

Frequency of Issue: Quarterly (January, April, July, October).

Location of Office of Publication, Business Office of Publisher and Owner: The Entomological Society of Wash- ington, c/o Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, 10th and Constitution NW, Wash- ington, D.C. 20560.

Editor: Raymond J. Gagne, Systematic Entomology Laboratory, c/o U.S. National Museum NHB 168, Wash- ington, D.C. 20560.

Managing Editor and Known Bondholders or other Security Holders: none.

This issue was mailed 3 February 1984

Second Class Postage Paid at Washington, D.C. and additional mailing office. PRINTED BY ALLEN PRESS. INC., LAWRENCE, KANSAS 66044. USA

PROC. ENTOMOL. SOC. WASH.

86(1), 1984, pp. 1-10

VIGNETTES OF 100 YEARS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

T. J. Spilman

Systematic Entomology Laboratory, IIBIIL Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Natural History Building-NHB 168, Washington, D.C. 20560.

On March 12, 1984, we celebrate our centennial! The Entomological Society of Washington was conceived on February 29, 1884, at a small informal gathering and was born on March 12th at the first formal meeting at 1700 13th Street, N.W., in Washington. The Society was founded to foster the study of insects and to bring together those interested in the subject. In both of these objectives the Society has been eminently successful.

The history of our Society and its members is in many ways fascinating. I recommend the excellent histories written by the master story-teller, L. O. How- ard, who was present at the creation, and by Ashley B. Gurney who brought the history up to date in our Proceedings of 1976 (78: 225-239) and gave references to all past histories.

A society is made up of individuals and each in his or her own way is unique. Some become stars and light up the sky: some plod along and hardly cause a dent in the sand; some are interesting, some dull; some good, some bad. Of some we hardly know a thing, only their names; but of others we know much, even some- thing of their personality, manners, and dealings with others. For our 100th birthday I choose to tell not the larger stories of the Society but the stories of a few individuals. So much has been written of the three principal founders of our Society that Til not dwell on them: Charles Valentine Riley (1843-1895). Leland Ossian Howard ( 1 857-1 950), and Eugene Amandus Schwarz ( 1 844-1 928). Never- theless, I can't resist letting a few words about each of these three important men creep into these stories.

Our Society, from the very beginning, has not been an impersonal organization. On the contrary, it has been very personal, excelling in a mix of amateurism, professionalism, exchange of ideas, and conviviality. The minutes record how important the meetings were and various writers on the history of the Society have described the brotherhood that prevailed. Because some stories concern early meetings of the Society, and because today's meetings are conducted dif- ferently, a short explanation is in order. Very early meetings were held in the homes of members, but as meetings became larger, they were switched to various halls, such as the Sangerbund Hall. Members stayed after meetings, for what were called annex meetings, to talk informally about insects and very nearly everything else. It was a time for social intercourse and friendship, with lots of good refresh- ments. (Today we have a somewhat analogous practice; a few attendees gather before the meeting for dinner at a restaurant on 10th Street near the Natural History Building of the Smithsonian and all attendees take part in a short social period, with refreshments, after the meeting.)

2 PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

Stories of members are part of the cherished history of our Society. They put Hving flesh and blood on the names in our Society. We hear and tell these stories over and over, and some stories get better or even worse in the retelling. I have scanned the publications of our Society, especially the minutes, read parts of biographies and autobiographies of a few members, and talked to anyone inter- ested in the subject. Much has been borrowed (a little stolen?) and I thank all, dead or alive, for telling these stories. A few vignettes of perhaps a hundred stories that I have read or heard will serve as examples of how interesting entomologists of the past hundred years were, how they were motivated in their work, and how they were viewed by others. These stories concern members but not necessarily their activities in the Society. You might have other favorite stories. These are mine.

Cockroach Stories

At one of the early "annex" meetings a member spied a cockroach, and this began a round-robin of stories, with several members contributing their favorite roach stories. John B. Smith (1858-1912) relates the following sequence of what was said. Riley said that in his office there was a roach that had become quite tame and familiar. It manifested no fear of him, would watch him at his work and would, when a finger was presented, climb on it, run around on his hand, and make itself very much at home. Howard stated that he also had a tame roach, and this specimen had a fondness for tobacco. He would, when smoking, occa- sionally lay his cigar on the edge of one of the drawers of his desk and the roach would come to the moist end and feast on nicotine. When taking up the cigar again, he would shake off" the roach who would wait until it was again replaced, and then the roach would again resume his feast. Another member, who modestly desired to have his name withheld, thought that insect intelligence had been much underrated. A young lady friend of his had a pet roach that used to frequent her dresser drawers and used to expect and appreciate the little tendernesses and endearments its mistress accorded it. For three years or thereabouts it lived happily, but then, for a short time, its mistress refused to notice it— other matters on her mind probably— and the little pet took it so to heart that it deliberately feasted on 'Pearl Powder,' knowing of its poisonous qualities, and died. Delib- erately committing suicide! A marvelous instance of insect intelligence.

That ends Smith's account of the meeting. Several of my colleagues thought Pearl Powder might have been an insecticide, but I couldn't find it mentioned in old books on insect control. At last I found it in a book on the history of cosmetics. It was a pomade and it contained several pernicious ingredients that could kill or, at least, disfigure. The entomologist's lady-friend would have used Pearl Pow- der on the face, neck, and bosom to produce an enamelled look, "the lily whiteness which so dazzles our eyes." O tempora! O mores!

Theodore Pergande

An early member, Theodore Pergande (1840-1916), was an amateur ento- mologist in Germany. He came to the United States because the girls in Germany bothered him so much and because he disliked prayer meetings. In the United States he eventually enlisted in the Army and served through the four years of the Civil War, making entomological collections over various battlefields. In St. Louis he met Riley and came to Washington with him. When Howard, just out of college, noted Pergande's difficulties with the English language, he recom-

VOLUME 86. NUMBER

Fig. 1 . Theodore Pergande.

mended that he study the masterpieces of English literature to cultivate a style of writing. Very soon thereafter Pergande, who made practically all the notes for the Bureau of Entomology for many years, began writing those notes in the style of Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene and similar masterpieces in English literature. It was entomology presented in a classical style.

Pergande was the subject of three items that have become special treasures to a few of us Washington entomologists. Two lovely genre photographs show Per- gande as an old man, seated at a desk complete with neighboring spittoon, peering through a fine old compound microscope (at one of his aphids?) and then looking up at the camera. One wonders why he wears a heavy overcoat indoors— did he just come in from the cold and immediately sit down to look at a new specimen, or had he put on the coat to leave and then took one last look at an enigmatic aphid? More likely, his cold old bones needed the warmth of that coat in a drafty museum. Quaint as are the pictures, they are not so strange as a treasure now in my possession. I have a lock of Pergande's hair! It is in an envelope so labeled and dated Apr. 28, '95. How it came to me I cannot recall, but someday I'll pass on that bit of incunabulum to another. Systematists are intrinsically collectors, no matter what the subject.

The Seal of the Society

The origin of our seal has for a long time been a mystery. Jon L. Herring in the Proceedings of 1964 (66: 1) discussed the story of the seal of the Society and

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

Fig. 2. Theodore Pergande.

its use on the cover of the Proceedings. A 1916 obituary of Otto Heidemann, the engraver of the seal, said that the seal used on the cover of the Proceedings had been adopted as the official seal of the Society. However, Herring could not verify the adoption in a search of pre-1916 minutes of the Society.

Perhaps we will never know the origin of that early action, but I have uncovered a later adoption. At a meeting on 6 October 1932, L. O. Howard reported to our Society on his visit to the Entomological Society of France and told of his dis- appointment in not having a seal of our Society to put on a portfolio of greetings. In a discussion, after Howard's report, it was stated that the question of a seal had been discussed on a number of previous occasions and that many of the older members had looked upon the cover illustration of the male of Rheuinatobates rileyi as the seal, "although it had never been officially designated as such." A motion was then duly made and seconded that the Society adopt as its official seal the emblem we now have (redrawn by Herring) on the cover of our Pro- ceedings.

Henry Ulke

Well before our Society was formed, entomologists in the Washington area met to discuss insects. One of the regulars of those early days was Henry Ulke (1821- 1910). He had come to the United States in 1849 after spending time in a prison

VOLUME 86, NUMBER 1

Fig. 3. Henry Ulke.

in Germany for political reasons. Eventually he settled in Washington as a pho- tographer and portrait painter. He had previously developed an interest in natural history, especially entomology. Well known for his work as a portraitist of famous people, Ulke became known as "Painter of Presidents." He was a close friend of Abraham Lincoln, and his most famous portrait was of President Grant.

It is ironic that Ulke lived in the Peterson House on 10th Street in 1865. Lincoln died in that house after being carried across the street from Ford's Theatre. What could have been going through Ulke's mind on that terrible night? We might know if the autobiography of Ulke could be found. A few lines of it were quoted in an obituary written by his friends, but the complete work cannot be found today. Just a few weeks ago I had a call from a writer who is doing a study of Ulke, asking about that autobiography. No amount of searching has been suc- cessful. If anyone knows of it, please bring it forward so we can learn more about this interesting person who once graced our Society.

Because of his knowledge of beetles and his wonderful collection he published an annotated list of the beetles of the District of Columbia area— he was sought after by famous entomologists. His stature can perhaps be summed up by the kind and touching words of William H. Dall, the natural history explorer and invertebrate zoologist, in a letter to Ulke, ". . . be sure I shall always think of you when I see a beetle."

At the conclusion of meetings held in the local Sangerbund Hall Ulke would

6 PROCEEDINGS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON

often entertain with a masterful rendition on the piano of the Pilgrim's Chorus from Wagner's Tannhauser. It was fitting that he was carried to his final resting place as the subdued strains of that fine Chorus was played.

Harrison G. Dyar

Every discipline has its rivalries, and entomology is no exception. Most are friendly, but sometimes the rivalry gets out of hand and develops into envy or jealousy. There has not been a duel with pistols or sabers, but systematists don't need pistols or sabers for dueling— words or names, if used dramatically, can bloody a man's reputation or wound very seriously his pride. The story of such a duel has been told many times by word of mouth and in print, even in the secular press. It is said that early in this century two of our members, both former presidents, developed a mutual dislike that developed into a nomenclatural battle. John B. Smith, the lepidopterist, was a huge man. When his rival Harrison G. Dyar (1866-1929) wanted to antagonize Smith he named an especially fat and ugly moth smithiformis. Another version says that he used the specific name of corpulentis. It didn't take Smith long to retaliate: he named a genus of moth Dyaria. That doesn't seem untoward until one reflects on the double entendre. The pronunciation of that generic name reminds one of a disagreeable and some- times unmentionable malady. This is indeed a wonderful story, but unfortunately it is pure fiction. No such names were ever proposed by these entomological enemies!

Dyar was one of the most interesting members of our Society. His activities in noctuid and mosquito systematics are well known, but his exploits in his non- professional life are almost unbelievable. Dyar was a great digger of tunnels. In 1 906-1 9 1 6, from his first home near Dupont Circle in Washington he dug complex tunnels on various levels that extended approximately 200 or 500 feet and were large enough for a man to stand in. The tunnels were discovered in 1924 when a delivery truck fell through the pavement into one of them. The discoverers, not knowing the origin, thought the tunnels were used by German spies in World War I or by bootleggers during prohibition. Why did Dyar dig? He said he started digging a deep trench for his wife's hollyhocks, became interested in digging, and simply continued. He dug very wide and deep trenches, proceeded to wall and arch them with enameled brick, and finally covered and hid them with earth. In one version of the story he said they were for playrooms for his son but in another said simply that he liked the smell of fresh earth and dug for exercise. The outcome of his other exploits is almost as strange. Dyar, a wealthy man, maintained two homes; in one he had a wife, in the other a mistress. His amorous duplicity was discovered when two children named Dyar met in school and began talking of their fathers. They were surprised when they discovered that their fathers worked at the Smithsonian, then more surprised that they worked in Entomology, and finally astounded that their fathers worked on mosquitoes. The secret was out— their fathers were the same man! The stories are often combined, saying that the tunnels were dug between the two homes, but there is nothing to substantiate that embellishment.

When Dyar died W. T. M. Forbes said in an obituary that "there is no one to take his place." In more ways than he could have imagined, Forbes was right.

VOLUME 86, NUMBER 1

Hubbard's Scolytid Beetle

Henry G. Hubbard (1850-1899), the coleopterist, was a first-class collector. The cabinets of the National Museum of Natural History are amply blessed with his specimens, many from places that are today ecologically nonexistent. He spent much time in Arizona to help heal his respiratory difficulties, and there he ex- tensively investigated the fauna of the giant Cereus cactus. It was an unexplored area and the fauna of the cactus had not been studied. Anything could turn up— and did. Eugene A. Schwarz, his very close friend and scientific colleague, wrote to Hubbard from Washington on January 10, 1897, about the reaction of John B. Smith and A. D. Hopkins to a specimen sent from the cactus. "I must confess that your account of the 'most marvelous Cioid' did not strike me particularly and made up my mind that it was a species of Ozognathus (Ptinidae), the males of which have peculiarly-formed horns on the head. On Saturday upon returning from office after 4 o'cl P.M. I found your package and in order to see whether everything was all right I opened the pill boxes. When I came to the box containing the 'Cioid' and looked at the latter I came near being paralyzed and it required a superhuman effort and a swallow of whiskey to recover. Your Cioid turns out to